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Leski Auctions
The Art of Constant Rearrangement - 477 lots

This auction sale has already been held, and the items are no longer available. The lot details are displayed for information only.

Lot #13
Jean Baptiste Audebert

Perruche a Taches Noires du Cap de ...
Price Realised: *****

Lot #15
Linnaeus in his Lapland Dress

From an original Picture in the po...
Price Realised: *****

Lot #17
Charles Alexandre Lesueur

Nouvelle Hollande: Nouvelle Galle d...
Price Realised: *****

Lot #18
Charles Alexandre Lesueur

Nouvelle Hollande: Nouvelle Galle d...
Price Realised: *****

Lot #19
John Webber

Balagans or Summer Habitations, wit...
Price Realised: *****

Lot #20
John Webber

The Narta or Sledge for Burdens in ...
Estimate: A$ 750 - 1,000

Lot #22
John Heaviside Clark

i.) Hunting the Kangaroo, ii.) Repo...
Price Realised: *****

Lot #27
Joseph Lycett

Beaumonts’ Lake, Van Diemens Land
Estimate: A$ 500 - 750

Lot #28
Joseph Lycett

View from near the Top of Constitut...
Price Realised: *****

Lot #29
Joseph Lycett

Mount Direction, Near Hobart Town V...
Price Realised: *****

Lot #30
Joseph Lycett

View of Roseneath Ferry, Van Dieme...
Price Realised: *****

Lot #31
Joseph Lycett

Liverpool, New South Wales
Price Realised: *****

Lot #32
Louis Auguste De Sainson

Vue de l’entree du Port Jackson, 18...
Price Realised: *****

Lot #33
John William Lewin

Yellow-Ear Honey-Sucker (Plate V)
Estimate: A$ 500 - 750

Lot #36
R. Russel

(Landscape at Sunset)
Price Realised: *****

Lot #38
Louis Le Breton

Pecheurs de Tripang a la Baie Raffl...
Price Realised: *****

Lot #39
James Stuart

The First Settlement in Adelaide. J...
Price Realised: *****

Lot #41
John Skinner Prout

Hobart Town from the Government Pad...
Price Realised: *****

Lot #42
John Skinner Prout

Port Arthur, V.D.L.
Price Realised: *****

Lot #43
John Skinner Prout

The Cataract, Launceston
Price Realised: *****

Lot #44
John Skinner Prout

Port Jackson East of Bradley’s Head
Price Realised: *****

Lot #46
John Gould

Black striped Wallaby - Halmaturus ...
Price Realised: *****

Lot #48
John Gould

Spectacled Vampyre - Pteropus Consp...
Price Realised: *****

Lot #49
John Gould

Northern Nail Tailed Kangaroo - Ony...
Price Realised: *****

Lot #50
John Gould

Pademelon Wallaby - Halmaturus Thet...
Price Realised: *****

Lot #51
John Gould

Parry’s Wallaby - Halmaturus Parryi
Price Realised: *****

Lot #52
John Gould

Stripe-sided Rock Wallaby - Petroga...
Price Realised: *****

Lot #53
John Gould

Dusky-footed Rat - Mus Fuscipes
Price Realised: *****

Lot #54
John Gould

Broad-Faced Rat - Hypsiprymnus Plat...
Price Realised: *****

Lot #55
John Gould

White footed Antechinus - Antechinu...
Price Realised: *****

Lot #56
Louis Le Breton

New-Victoria (Port Essington)
Estimate: A$ 400 - 600

Lot #57
Louis Le Breton

Observatoire de la Baie Raffles
Price Realised: *****

Lot #58
John Skinner Prout

Elizabeth St., Melbourne (from “Vie...
Price Realised: *****

Lot #59
John Skinner Prout

View from Bateman’s Hill, Melbourne...
Price Realised: *****

Lot #60
John Skinner Prout

Corio Bay from the Barabool Hills, ...
Price Realised: *****

Lot #61
John Skinner Prout

Geelong, 1847, (from “Views in Melb...
Price Realised: *****

Lot #62
John Skinner Prout

Melbourne from Collingwood, 1847, (...
Price Realised: *****

Lot #63
John Skinner Prout

View of Heidelberg near Melbourne (...
Price Realised: *****

Lot #64
George French Angas

frontispiece from “South Australia ...
Price Realised: *****

Lot #65
George French Angas

Interior of Mount Gambier
Price Realised: *****

Lot #66
George French Angas

The Devil’s Punch Bowl, Near Mt Sha...
Price Realised: *****

Lot #67
George French Angas

Port Adelaide
Price Realised: *****

Lot #68
George French Angas

The City of Adelaide, from the Torr...
Price Realised: *****

Lot #69
George French Angas

Crater of Mount Schanck
Price Realised: *****

Lot #70
George French Angas

From the Barossa, Looking over part...
Price Realised: *****

Lot #71
George French Angas

Rapid Bay. Encampment of Yankallil...
Price Realised: *****

Lot #72
George French Angas

Coast Scene near Rapid Bay. Sunset....
Price Realised: *****

Lot #73
George French Angas

Klemsic. A Village of German settle...
Price Realised: *****

Lot #74
George French Angas

Grass Trees at Yankalilla with the...
Price Realised: *****

Lot #75
George French Angas

The Aboriginal Inhabitants. (their ...
Price Realised: *****

Lot #76
George French Angas

Scene on the Coorong, near Lake Alb...
Price Realised: *****

Lot #77
George French Angas

Port Lincoln, looking across Boston...
Price Realised: *****

Lot #78
George French Angas

Falls of Glen Stuart.
Price Realised: *****

Lot #79
George French Angas

Old Gum Tree on the Gawler
Price Realised: *****

Lot #80
George French Angas

Bethany, A Village of German settle...
Price Realised: *****

Lot #81
Robert Marsh Westmacott

Natives (Armed and In Deep Mourning...
Price Realised: *****

Lot #82
John Gould

Helmeted Honey Eater – Tropidorynch...
Price Realised: *****

Lot #83
John Gould

Australian Tippet Grebe – Podiceps ...
Price Realised: *****

Lot #84
John Gould

Vigor’s Pitta - Pitta Vigorsii
Price Realised: *****

Lot #85
John Gould

Grey Headed Blackbird – Merula Poli...
Price Realised: *****

Lot #86
John Gould

Roufus Gallinule – Gallinula Ruficr...
Price Realised: *****

Lot #87
John Gould

Ianthocincla Artemisiae (Allied Ian...
Price Realised: *****

Lot #88
European School

Landscape with walled town
Price Realised: *****

Lot #91
Edmund Thomas

William’s Town Lighthouse, Hobson’s...
Price Realised: *****

Lot #94
Edmund Thomas

Collins Street, Melbourne
Price Realised: *****

The Art of Constant Rearrangement


  • Auction House:
  • Reference:
    #A441
  • Description:
    The Joshua McClelland Print Room & Rathdowne Galleries
    The Joshua McClelland Print Room came to life when our father opened a small gallery in Little Collins Street, Melbourne, in 1927. When he died in 1956 our mother, Joan, took over the business. A few years later, our mother heard rumours that “the trade” had given her six months before folding. The gallery survived – and sometimes prospered – for another sixty-two years, so there must have been something in the Joshua McClelland Print Room’s particular art of constant re-arrangement that made it the longest surviving, continuously functioning gallery in Melbourne and probably Australia. Our mother died in late 2017 at the age of 104 and we decided, in the wake of that loss, that we would begin the difficult task of closing down. This catalogue and auction, containing some very early acquisitions and some of our very recent ones, will be the final chapter and, we hope, a lasting remembrance of our late parents and the roles they played in the cultural life of the city.
    Our father had grown up in Flinders Street, in a large old house where the Herald and Weekly Times offices were later built. He, and his younger brother, were thrown out of the house for raffish behavior – racing their horses along Swanston Street! He was obviously a spirited young man, a fine combination of rebel and aesthete and it would appear that the Melbourne of the period, the early ‘20s, suited his temperament.
    His first venture, The Little Gallery, was opened in 1927 in Little Collins Street, behind Georges Department Store. Then, in the early ‘30s he moved to an upstairs room further down Little Collins Street. He told us it was hugely popular with his friends in winter as it had an open fireplace and it became something of a gathering place for artists and dealers. Our father’s interests at that time were antiquarian. The first exhibition was tantalizingly called “Rare Lithographs” and it was almost certainly predominantly English and topographical images.
    In 1936, the year our parents married, the gallery moved to 79 Collins Street, a long, narrow, street-level shop, very light and with a beautiful façade, where furniture, silver, porcelain and paintings were offered. Next door, at 81, was the downstairs print gallery and the storeroom. No.79 turned out to be a very convenient drop-in spot for the Collins Street doctors and other inhabitants of that part of town, and many of them became collectors and long-term clients. One could park right outside and there were various popular lunch places nearby, not to mention the Oriental and Occidental hotels. Among the frequent visitors, the director of the National Gallery of Victoria, Daryl Lindsay, would drop in to discuss a new acquisition.
    In those days, what was to become the print room was used for special exhibitions. Then, in the early 1950s, when the bank needed to take over the premises, our father decided to sell up the antique furniture side of the business and concentrate on using the basement as a permanent gallery.
    Why did he call it The Print Room? We never really asked him that question, but certainly, in the 1940s and ‘50s, there was a climate of great respect for the print. There was the fabulous print room at the NGV supervised by Ursula Hoff and it was a highlight of a fine arts course to have tutorials in the print room and pour over the William Blakes. The Australian Painters & Etchers Society, established in the 1920s, was at it’s peak and many collectors who bought from our gallery would include sharing their latest additions to their print cabinets with dinner guests. And it was during these years that a greater appreciation of early Australian historical maps and prints was becoming evident. Among the artists exhibited at The Print Room in the 1940s and ‘50s were Lionel Lindsay, John Shirlow, Sydney Long, Sydney Ure Smith, Penleigh Boyd, Napier Waller, Fred McCubbin and Arthur Boyd.
    When our father died, in 1956, our mother decided to carry on the business with a focus on prints, paintings and Chinese porcelain, which, as she explained, seemed manageable. She was greatly helped in this by several collectors who generously traded pieces through the Print Room and from whom she learned a great deal. Several other timely events helped her in those early days of business in her own right. A great friend, Harry Tatlock Miller, had gone to London and was working with the Redfern Gallery and, with his assistance, mother arranged to have several exhibitions of French prints and posters, quite a radical departure in the otherwise artistically staid post-war environment of Melbourne.
    However, as our mother said, “Against all this my real interest was in Australiana – the prints from the early Voyages and early topographical prints. There was a real interest in historical prints in the sixties, seventies and eighties. There was a period of pride and confidence in our history. There was a distinctly humanist element in the collectors of those days. They were deeply interested in the aboriginal inhabitants, the early voyages and contemporary science, especially the botanical and zoological depictions of Australia by the early artists.”
    The Print Room stayed at Number 81 until 1979, when Conzinc Riotinto came to the rescue and gave our parents the front first floor of 105 Collins Street. The building was to be demolished “at some stage” so The Print Room and other “congenial tenants” were able to make use of a wonderful space which also came with free parking. And the rent was VERY reasonable! It was around this time that our mother started to exhibit a group of women printmakers. Her sympathy with them seems natural to us: she belonged, at least in spirit, to the same generation. She had an interest in international events and the printmakers she supported were experimenting with new subjects: sporting scenes, women at work, a jokey attitude to home and garden work. On the subject of historical prints, our mother had said “The Australian market is a wayward business with highs and lows, especially lows…..and I felt the need to encourage young printmakers to exhibit, which we did, with varying success.”
    When 105 finally came to demolition, The Print Room moved to the second floor, 15 Collins Street. The premises included a large balcony overlooking Collins Street, which was great for exhibition openings.
    It would be true to say that by this time at least half the business of the Print Room was in Asian art, including Chinese porcelain, Japanese lacquer and Japanese woodblock prints as well as South-East Asian textiles. Mother was one of the first Australian gallerists to visit China, beginning on the early 1970s. She made an annual pilgrimage to London and made frequent trips to Japan, Cambodia, Vietnam and Malaysia, always acquiring new items for the gallery. She rarely stood still.
    Most recently, and with our mother having reached her hundredth birthday (and still working!) we moved the business to 310 Rathdowne Street, Carlton and it is from that lovely old building that we are finally saying goodbye as a gallery.
    Can one still make a living in a print gallery? To quote from the title of a recent book on Margaret Preston, “The Art of Constant Rearrangement”, you need to be eclectic, flexible, willing to explore new avenues and carry other work.
    To give mother the final words:
    “It is probably true that we would not have survived if we had dealt only in prints. Every now and then an important painting, or a fine piece of Chinese porcelain would make a difference. Tom Robert’s Coming South, and Russell Drysdale’s Maria are two such works that saved the day.”
    We thank all our clients and friends, past and present, for your support, encouragement and friendship and, on our parents’ behalf, we wish you many years of health and happiness enjoying the works of beauty and creativity with which you live and work.
    Philippa Kelly, Patricia Williams and Joanna Lulofs
  • Sale(s):
    05 May 2019 ~ 12noon (AEST)
    727-729 High Street
    Armadale, VIC 3143 Australia
  • Viewing:
    02 May 2019 ~ 10am - 5pm
    727-729 High Street
    Armadale, VIC 3143
    Australia

    03 May 2019 ~ 10am - 5pm
    727-729 High Street
    Armadale, VIC 3143
    Australia

    04 May 2019 ~ 10am - 5pm
    727-729 High Street
    Armadale, VIC 3143
    Australia

    05 May 2019 ~ 9am - 11am
    727-729 High Street
    Armadale, VIC 3143
    Australia

Prices realised in this sale include buyers premium of 21.450%.



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